Friday, December 30, 2016

Your Health Checklist For The New Year

By:  Dr. John A. Papa, DC, FCCPOR(C)

The New Year is quickly approaching and it is time to start thinking about all the changes or "resolutions" we would like to commit to.  The purpose of this article is to give you a head start on planning to act on those resolutions that pertain to health and wellness.
 
GETTING MORE EXERCISE:  Always a popular promise many individuals make to themselves going into the New Year.  Unfortunately, many fail to engage in or sustain a meaningful exercise program.  Several keys to making exercise work for you include scheduling exercise into daily activities to make it as convenient as possible and choosing exercise activities that you enjoy.  Health benefits can be realized in as little as 45 minutes, three times per week.  Starting off slowly and easing into activity will help prevent injuries.  Be sure to incorporate components of aerobic, resistance, and flexibility training to ensure you are getting the full benefits of exercise.

NUTRITIONAL BALANCE:  Sensible eating should consist of nutritional balance with the correct proportion of quality carbohydrates, proteins, and healthy fats.  Significant and positive changes can be made to your eating habits by cutting down serving sizes, eliminating unhealthy snacking, and minimizing foods that can be detrimental to your health.  Your body only functions as well as the fuel you put into it.

STRESS MANAGEMENT:  Unresolved stresses can lead to many health problems if left unchecked.   Changing the way we think about stress can be the first step toward better health.  Some stresses can be avoided while others can be confronted and resolved.  There are certain stresses that we cannot do anything about, so don’t fret about things beyond your control.  Rely on close family and friends to help you through times of stress.  The New Year is a time of starting fresh, and letting go of things that prevent you from enjoying life.

SLEEP:  Important biological mechanisms function during sleep hours to help our bodies recharge, recover, and recuperate.  The average adult requires six to eight hours of restful sleep each night.  As little as three days of sleep deprivation has been shown to significantly compromise productivity, create problems in relationships, and contribute to numerous health problems.  Restful sleep is essential for good health and its importance should not be underestimated.

ELIMINATING BAD HABITS:  From a health perspective, some of these may include quitting smoking, limiting alcohol or caffeine intake, watching less TV, not brushing or flossing our teeth regularly, or being ornery towards others.  In reality, a list of bad health habits may be longer for some than others.  Commit to eliminating three of your worst health habits and see how much better this makes you feel.
 
For additional information on how you can improve your health and wellness, visit our website at www.nhwc.ca.   From all of us at the New Hamburg Wellness Centre, good luck and Season’s Greetings!

This article is a basic summary for educational purposes only.  It is not intended, and should not be considered, as a replacement for consultation, diagnosis or treatment by a duly licensed health practitioner.